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LFKC / Calvi Sainte-Catherine / LCY

10 mai 2016 (mis à jour le 1er juin 2016) - Transports
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This page is intended to draw commercial and private pilots’ attention to the aeronautical context and main threats related to an aerodrome. They have been identified in a collaborative way by the main organisations operating, to, on the platform (airlines, airport operator, air navigation service provider, aero clubs, Meteo France…) by comparing items from their respective safety management systems (SMS). Such information has been validated by the members of the Local Safety Teams (LST) of the aerodromes.

Click on the titles of the contents to get more details on the identified threats.

Updated on 01 June 2016



CONTENTS

GENERAL / ENVIRONMENT

ARRIVAL

RUNWAY

IFR CLEARANCE / TAXI

DEPARTURE

DISCLAIMER

 

GENERAL / ENVIRONMENT

Risk of time pressure at nightfall

The airfield is unauthorized for night landings. VFR and IFR crews may be subject to time pressure as the aeronautical night approaches.

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Numerous aeronautical activities performed around the CTR

Paragliders, parachutes, aircraft performing air training or touristic VFR planes fly in and around the CTR. Aeronautical activities are likely to be numerous and often increased by fire-fighting airtankers on fire mission (Turbo Firecats and Super Scoopers).

Parachute dropping in area n°434 : area active every other day on average with droppings usually at 1000 ft, 3000 ft and FL 120. It is located close to the final runway 18 / initial climb runway 36, between E and EA points. This area gathers 11 landing zones within a distance of 3NM.
 
Possible paraglider activity :
  • In the CTR, close to E point (4 CTR intrusions reported in 2015) ;
  • Outside but bordering CTR, to the South of E point as well as abeam the runway and to the East (FFVL non approved spots).

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Restricted use of the airfield by airliners due to high terrain

It is mandatory for airlines willing to create a new line to submit a file to the DSAC depending on the aircraft mass and on the number of passengers (see AD 2LFKC ADC TEXT01 $2).

  • Crew rating earned by site reconnaissance or simulator training ;
  • Procedure published on SIA website for runway 18 only. Airlines will have to submit a file ;
  • Arrival runway 36 procedure must be described in a specific file with detailed instructions for the circling.

 
Runway 18 : MAPT is far from the runway due to terrain and the balked landing after MAPT has to be detailed by the airliner.
 
Runway 36 : the high terrain interferes with the downwind and shortens the base leg (especially with a strong West wind) and causes turbulence downdrafts and vertical windshear (during downwind base and final).

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Significant weather phenomena for aeronautics

Strong wind from the West and South-West sectors and thunderstorms are the main phenomena.

 
Strong wind from the West and South-West sectors
 
  • Possibility to be grounded when the surface wind takes a south component : the wind allows landings runway 18 but not the take-offs as this QFU requires complying with special conditions (to submit a file and to receive a DSAC approval). The take-off runway 36 is then subject to the tailwind limitation of each aircraft ;
  • Turbulence and downdrafts at runway 18 threshold and nearby Marsolinu pass (end of left-hand downwind runway 36) ;
  • Runway 36 left-hand base leg shortened due to the West wind that pushes the plane forwards.
 
Thunderstorm
 
Thunderstorm activity may have an impact on CV NDB (STARR LIBLO2 and holding pattern).

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ARRIVAL

Converging IFR and VFR tracks

IFR crews must ensure that the final path and the runway are free of traffic prior to their approach runway 18 (by asking to the tower controller). At busy times VFR flights waiting outside the CTR between 1000 ft and 2000 ft may be numerous at E, W and S points.

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Probability of going around increased by high terrain

The numerous high mountains around the airport and the extended visual phase of the approach increase the likelihood of a balked landing.

Video : LOC 18 circling 36 approach at Calvi (downloading may be slow)

Note : these are real tracks taken from commercial flights operated by airlines serving the airport and reproduced in a quasi-realistic environment (Google Earth). They have been optimized to focus on the specific threats of these approach paths.

- Multi-engine aircraft
The approach must not be made with a failed engine except if the pilot decides that it is an emergency.
 
- Successive visual approaches
They are not allowed due to a possible speed catch-up between the 2 planes and because the missed approach or balked landing tracks if the first plane comes across the approach path of the second aircraft.
 
- Runway 18
Obstacles to the West and close to the threshold may cause turbulence on short final.
 
- Runway 36
  • The circling requires special conditions : MDH 1500 ft, ceiling 2500 ft, horizontal visibility 8000 m, downwind at 1500 ft on the West side.
  • The terrain located to the West of the runway shorten the base leg (especially with a strong West wind) and causes turbulence downdrafts and vertical windshear from the downwind to the short final.

Example 1 : Balked landing runway 18

Example 2 : Circling 36 according to the airline specifications

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PAPI runway 36 specifics

  • The lights are placed 3° offset from the runway axis.
  • It is forbidden to use the PAPI at a distance of more than 4 km from the displaced threshold (obstacle clearance is not assured).
  • The PAPI is set for aircraft such as A320 flying over the threshold .

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Low approach timing that may cause delays

The number of planes per hour that can perform the approach successively is low (4 to 6). Thus it is possible to wait a long time in the hold (plan more fuel and an alternate airport).

 
An aircraft can begin the approach only when the preceding traffic has landed as the missed approach and the arrival tracks are convergent. The number of IFR that can land each hour is then reduced : 6 planes per hour runway 18 and 4 runway 36). At busy times the waiting time may be increased.

RUNWAY

Runway with a downward slope

The airport has a runway with a downward slope of 2% from runway 36 threshold to runway 18 threshold. This may cause the aircraft to land long runway 36, to brake hard and then to backtrack slowly the runway until the exit taxiway.

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IFR CLEARANCE / TAXI

 Very short taxiways to access the runway

The taxiways that give access to the runway are registered as « hotspots » on the SIA charts.
  • The short taxi time between the aprons and the holding points on taxiways A, B and C may cause runway incursions.
  • The lack of a taxiway leading to the northern threshold increases the runway occupation time (backtrack before take-off / after landing and crossing planes on the runway).

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Altitude given in IFR departure clearance often limited to 4000 ft

The altitude of the departure clearance is limited when another aircraft is waiting in the hold at ILROU (or BISKI). The aircraft on departure will be limited at 4000 ft until it is established on 302° magnetic course inbound BUNAX (strategically separated with the holding pattern) due to aircraft holding at 5000ft.

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DEPARTURE

 Prior authorization of the operator needed for night take-offs

Night take-offs are possible with the authorization of the airport operator (a request is to be sent to the CCI de Haute-Corse via  +334 95 65 88 00 or +336 80 36 55 26).

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Restricted choice of a departure runway due to high terrain

Departure runway 36 : preferential runway until the maximum tailwind component of the aircraft.
 
Departure runway 18 :
  • Subject to minimum meteorological conditions (ceiling 1500 ft, visibility 8 km) ;
  • Prior authorization needed for aircraft with 10 passengers or more or with a MTOW of 5700 kg or more.

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 DISCLAIMER

 
The pieces of information provided are published only for indication, information and are not exhaustive. We make our best to keep them updated. They are a valuable complement for flight preparation but they cannot and should not replace the reference aeronautical information contained in the AIP France (Aeronautical Information Publication), AIP supp, AIC (Aeronautical Information Circular) and NOTAM.
 

This page has been produced with the help of Air Corsica, Air France, HOP ! and pilots of local flying clubs, who have provided their expertise and teaching aid.

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