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LFPG / Paris-Charles de Gaulle / CDG

20 mai 2016 (mis à jour le 28 juillet 2016) - Transports
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This page is intended to draw commercial and private pilots’ attention to the aeronautical context and main threats related to an aerodrome. They have been identified in a collaborative way by the main organisations operating, to, on the platform (airlines, airport operator, air navigation service provider, aero clubs, Meteo France…) by comparing items from their respective safety management systems (SMS). Such information has been validated by the members of the Local Safety Teams (LST) of the aerodromes.

Click on the titles of the contents to get more details on the identified threats.

Updated on 28 July 2016



CONTENTS

GENERAL / ENVIRONMENT

ARRIVAL

RUNWAY

IFR CLEARANCE / TAXI

DEPARTURE

DISCLAIMER

 


GENERAL / ENVIRONMENT

Triple simultaneous parallel approach ; parallel departures in all weather conditions

CDG is one of the few approaches in the world to provide a triple simultaneous parallel approach and also parallel departures in all weather conditions.

 
In this particular context, crews have to be aware that ATC will usually optimize the global traffic instead of optimizing a single flight. Be advised also that the general rule applied at CDG is on the basis of “first come, first served”.
 
 

Request for a runway change : a threat for both pilot and controller

For runway allocations, specific ATC tools (departure and arrival manager) are used for real time optimization. That’s why crews should not request a runway change for departure or arrival.

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Risk of unpredictable trajectory when avoiding due to weather

The particularities of parallel approaches and departures imply that when crews need to deviate from their track due to weather (CBs), they must first communicate to ATC their new heading and for which distance they need this new flight path.

 
If able, advise ATC when you line up on the runway if you need a specific heading just after take-off.
 
Be advised that ATC do not have any tool allowing CBs visualization on the radar display.
 

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Separation minima infringement risk if delay in complying with ATC clearance

Because of the congested airspace, ATC instructions must be followed without any delay.

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ARRIVAL

Entering a hold without clearance is a threat for following aircraft

Do not hold at the initial approach fix even if no approach clearance has been issued unless instructed by ATC. Follow the published standard approach path.

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Best practice when handed over from Paris ACC to De Gaulle approach

On first contact with De Gaulle approach, report to ATC the latest speed instructed by the preceding sector (Paris ACC).

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Simultaneous parallel approach

There are specific regulations to provide spacing between aircraft on parallel approach. At CDG, distance between Localizer courses is less than 3 NM which is the minimum radar separation. That’s why aircraft closing in on parallel approach courses must be vertically (1000 ft) separated.

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Application of defined minimum vertical speed for inbound aircraft to avoid potential separation minima infringement

Aircraft inbound for runways 09 L/R or runways 26 L/R must apply a minimum rate of descent of 1300 ft/min, except during speed reduction phases.

Additional information on the origin of this constraint are given in the video below.

 


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Prevention of mid-air collisions : interception of final approach course

When a vector instruction has been given leading to closing in on final approach course with an angle of less than 70°, and unless the pilot has been specifically instructed to cross the runway centerline by ATC, it is required that aircraft, even without interception clearance issued, intercept the ILS localizer course or any replacement approach aid.

Speed adherence on approach : essential to avoid potential wake turbulence separation minima infringement

Pilots must comply with speed instructed by ATC. If unable to comply, advise ATC immediately.

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RUNWAY

 Specificities of HIRO

The minimum spacing provided between inbound aircraft is compliant with the new wake turbulence recategorization regulation called RECAT EU.
 
When High Intensity Runway Operations (HIRO) are in force, plan the most appropriate runway exit regarding operational conditions to minimize runway occupancy time.

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Late landing clearance in LVP

When LVP are in force, landing clearance will be issued at the latest when aircraft is at 1 NM on final (due to departure from the parallel runway or preceding landing).

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Runway incursion prevention and runway vacating

Runway high speed turn off have been designed to vacate the runway at a maximum speed of 50 knots. Pilots have to adapt their speed according to runway conditions.

After vacating a runway, do not stop in the runway protected area (90 m or 150 m in LVP). Without clearance, follow published standard routing.
 
For inbound aircraft, stay on tower frequency until the set of 2 runways is completely vacated (runway protected area included).
 
Aircraft vacating inner runways have priority regarding aircraft taxiing on the first taxiway parallel to the runway unless instructed otherwise (Example : Tango taxiway for southern set of runways).
 

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Continuous bilateral contact between pilot and controller  

After take-off, departure frequency is not given by the tower controller anymore. Crews must prepare it before take-off and wait for frequency change instruction issued by the tower controller. Do not change frequency on your own.

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IFR CLEARANCE / TAXI

Apron intermediate holding points and responsibiliy transfer

At terminal 2, the red line on the map below is the limit between the maneuvering area and the apron area. This zone is marked on the ground by intermediate holding points (example : Stop TE1). When crews taxi across this intermediate holding point from the maneuvering area to the apron area, there is a transfer of responsibility from ATC to Pilots regarding anti-collision (between aircraft and between aircraft and vehicules).
 
For all intermediate holding points (at terminal 2, middle1, 2, 3 and 4, and for FEDEX apron), without clearance to continue beyond, crews must stop when reaching them.
 
 

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Risks associated to departure or arrival to/from stand

If you notice that your push back is incorrect regarding the push back clearance, advise without delay on apron frequency.

A push back clearance is valid for only one minute.
 
Pilots should not enter a parking stand unless under instruction from a marshaller or following indications from an operational visual docking guidance system. If that is not the case, the aircraft should hold position on the taxilane centerline in front of the parking stand lead-in line and notify Ground Movement Control.

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Collision risk with deicing trucks

To enter or exit a deicing pad, crews need a clearance. They must also observe the deicing stop bar.

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Possible delay when taking off from some intermediate taxiways 

If you plan to take off from taxiways Q6, D1, D2, R1, T1 or T2, you must inform delivery and be advised that you may have a delay because of wake turbulence generated by inbound aircraft on the closest parallel runway.

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DEPARTURE

 

Speed management on departure and separation minima infringement risk

Speed limit is 250 knots below FL 100 unless ATC request an increase in speed for spacing.

After noise abatement departure procedure, increase speed to 250 knots to avoid with the following aircraft catching up on initial departure. If that is not possible, immediately advise ATC.
 
Be advised that a low climb speed (high gradient) will not guarantee a shorter track. ATC optimize each aircraft trajectory according to the global traffic situation.
 

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High vertical speed and TCAS RA

When approaching cleared flight level, adjust vertical speed to avoid TCAS RA between departing and arriving aircraft.

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 DISCLAIMER

 

The pieces of information provided are published only for indication, information and are not exhaustive. We make our best to keep them updated. They are a valuable complement for flight preparation but they cannot and should not replace the reference aeronautical information contained in the AIP France (Aeronautical Information Publication), AIP supp, AIC (Aeronautical Information Circular) and NOTAM.

 

 

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